Aging Well Blog

You are a take charge person. You like being in the driver’s seat. It’s your life and you want to be sure you get to live it your way.

Perhaps you cared for your parents and want things handled differently when you reach your own elderhood. Maybe you do not have children and wonder who will help you when you need it. Perhaps you do have children and want to have your independence, make your own decisions.

This blog is for those who want to proactively plan for their later years. Check out our monthly posts for thoughts that can help you decide what will work best for you in terms of housing, paying for care, and meeting life’s challenges as you age.

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Living apart together

Living apart togetherCan two households be better than one? In a trend called "living apart together" (LAT), a growing number of older adults are experimenting with committed relationships that also allow for autonomy. These are people who prefer intimacy and companionship in their lives. At the same time, marriage—or even living together—brings more entanglements than they want...

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Medicare: Wellness and prevention

If you are used to having an "annual physical" and ask for that, original Medicare won't pay for it. That is, original Medicare won't pay doctors to do a general physical exam "to see what turns up"; you'll pay out of pocket. (Medicare Advantage might have this as an "extra." Check with your plan.) Medicare...

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Making friends in later life

Making friends in later lifeWe tend to think friendships should grow organically. They don't. Particularly in our later years, when we often lose friends—to death, illness, or moving away—we need to be much more intentional about making new ones. This is especially so for "solo agers," those without children and grandchildren. The younger generations in the family typically make...

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Crime proofing your home

Seniors experience property crime thirteen times more often than violent crime. Burglary is the most common. (Interestingly, it typically occurs between noon and 4:00 pm!) The average loss is roughly $3,000, although that does not account for the emotional impact: A profound sense of violation and vulnerability. October is Crime Prevention Month. There are things...

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Sharing your home

Sharing your homeThere are many advantages to having a housemate: Defraying expenses. Sharing household chores. Help with transportation. Companionship. Increased safety. Peace of mind. In a survey of older adults who shared their homes, 50% said that since gaining a housemate, they are happier, sleep better, are getting out more, and they call upon their families less...

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Saying “no” when your kids ask for money

Saying "no" when your kids ask for moneyOnce you've decided it's unwise to give or lend money to children—or grandchildren—think through how you want to communicate your decision. Money is often equated with love. Even if this is a loving decision (e.g., you've determined that giving or lending them money is encouraging something unhealthy), how and when you decline is important for...

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“With a little help from our friends”: The Village movement

Aging in place has great appeal and can be challenging and expensive. Elders who are part of a "Village" help each other with simple tasks, making it easier and more financially feasible to stay at home. Today, there are close to 250 Villages across the country. They are part of a widespread grassroots movement of...

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Medicare coverage while traveling

Planning a trip? Your health insurance might not come with you! International travel. If you need medical care outside the United States—an ER visit, hospitalization, ambulance, medical exam, labs, or a medical evacuation—there are very few circumstances in which original Medicare will help out. You should be prepared to pay 100 percent of any medical...

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Solo aging: Eyes wide open

Aging comes to us all. What makes solo aging different is the need to be more proactive about arranging for help. Twenty-two percent of older adults acknowledge they will need to take care of themselves. (Even if you are partnered now or have children, you are wise to consider the possibility of solo aging because,...

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Getting rid of your stuff

Getting rid of your stuffOnce you get beyond the sentimental value of your belongings, you are still up against the logistics of how to get things out of your nest. Some stuff is easier to pass along to family than other stuff. Options for what's left over: Sell, donate, or just "get rid of it!" Start with family. You...

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